Hvar's Wildflowers and Plants in Winter

Mara of Go Hvar casts her artistic eye over Hvar's surprisingly abundant winter wildflowers.

Field marigold, December 2016 Field marigold, December 2016 Vivian Grisogono

In December, there are not so many flowers in bloom along the pathways of Hvar, but a few linger on from autumn because of the mild temperatures, while others are getting an early start on spring!  For this winter edition, I’ve expanded the scope to include seeds, fruits and leaves as they make quite the splash of colour on our walks!

Vine leaves - a lovely splash of colour in winter!

Here’s my winter reference table, with the usual health warning about my ability to identify plants correctly! So many can be very similar, especially the myriad varieties of small yellow flowers!! Click on the images for a bigger picture, and links go to wikipedia or plantea (Croatian) to find out more.


Arbutus

Arbutus
Strawberry tree
Planika
 
Arisarum vulgare
Arisarum vulgare
Friar’s cowl
Croatian not known
Bellis perennis
Bellis perennis
Common daisy (older name bruisewort)
Tratinčica
Calendula Arvenensis
Calendula arvensis
Field marigold
Neven (calendula officinalis)
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Orange
Mandarina
Not a native species, but all kinds of citrus trees grow really well on Hvar!
Crocus biflorus
Crocus biflorus
Silvery crocus
Dvocvjetni Šafran
Diplotaxis Tenuifolium
Diplotaxis tenuifolia
Perennial wall-rocket
Uskolisni dvoredac
Erica
Erica manipuliflora
(Winter-flowering) heather
Primorski vrijes
Hippocrepus comosa
Hippocrepus comosa
Horseshoe vetch
Croatian not known
Iberis sempervirens
Iberis sempervirens
Evergreen candytuft
Vazdazelena ognjica
Ipomoea purpurea
Ipomoea purpurea
Purple Morning Glory
Ukrasni slak
Juniperus communis
Juniperus communis
Common juniper
Borovica / Smrča
Juniperus phoenicea
Juniperus phoenicea
Phoenician juniper / Arar
Gluhač / Gluha smrča
The Croatian name translates as deaf juniper, implying this is not the common version.
Leontodon
Leontodon
Hawkbit (not to be confused with dandelion)
Lotus corniculatus
Lotus corniculatus
Bird’s Foot Trefoil
Svinđuša
Opuntia
Opuntia
Opuntia / Prickly pear
Opuncija / indijska smokva
Introduced from the Americas
pinus-halipensis-aleppo-pine-cones
Pinus halepensis
Aleppo pine
Alepski bor
Pittosporum tobira
Pittosporum tobira
Mock orange
Pitospor
Import from Japan, China and the Far East
Holm oak
Quercus ilex
Holm oak
Hrast crnika / česmina
Rosemary
Rosmarinus officinalis
Rosemary
Ružmarin
Sedum
Sedum
Stonecrop
Bijeli žednjak
No flowers at this time of year, but very pretty amongst the rocks!
Bladder campion
Silene vulgaris
Bladder Campion
Pušina
Solanum nigrum
Solanum nigrum
Black nightshade
Crna pomoćnica
Taraxacum
Taraxacum
Dandelion
Maslačak
Vaccinium
Vaccinium myrtillus
Bilberry / blaeberry*
Borovnica **
Viburnum tinus
Viburnum tinus
Laurustinus
Lemprika
Yucca
Yucca
Yucca
Juka
Another import from the Americas

* Not a misprint, blaeberry is the Scots spelling (see https://sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaeberry). Blueberries are from a related but specifically American plant. Bilberries or blaeberries are a European shrub/tree. Berries look and taste very similar apparently but I like to assume any bushes growing wild on Hvar are the native variety unless they're obvious imports! I have to admit this was actually news to me as I was researching the plants, but luckily Zdravko knew the difference.

** Of course the other thing we know about Borovnica is the very tasty liqueur that is made from them!  For a recipe in Croatian, click here.

© Marion Podolski 2017

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