Dogs as friends

Published in About Animals

Dogs in a loving home become friends with their owners. They say that anyone who doesn't like animals doesn't like humans either.

Pouchkine, happy rescue dog Pouchkine, happy rescue dog Photo: Vivian Grisogono

Dogs have special ways of communicating with people who understand and love them.

If they could speak, they might tell us some interesting things about themselves, their wants, hopes and fears. They might also include a few home truths to put us in our place.

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© Vivian Grisogono 2016 

 

 

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