About Us

THE CHARITY'S DETAILS:

  

ECO HVAR, UDRUGA ZA DOBROBIT LJUDI, ŽIVOTINJA I OKOLIŠA OTOKA HVARA
(A not-for-profit organization for the wellbeing of people, animals and the environment on the Island of Hvar)
Registered address: Pitve 93, 21465 Jelsa, Hrvatska / Croatia
OIB (tax identity number): 14009858487
General registration number (matični broj): 04089316
Number on the Register of not-for-profit organizations (broj iz matičnog registra): 17004814.
(Old RNO number 0254098)

BANK DETAILS

Privredna Banka Zagreb d.d.
Poslovnica 220 Pjaca, Pjaca 1
21465 Jelsa, Croatia
IBAN: HR37 2340 0091 1106 0678 6 (Account number)
SWIFT CODE: PBZGHR2X
Account name: ECO HVAR
Address of account holder: Pitve 93, 21465 Jelsa, Croatia

o-nama

COMMITTEE MEMBERS, CHARITY REPRESENTATIVES:

NADA KOZULIĆ, the Charity's Vice President, is a lawyer by profession. From being a prize-winning student at the Zagreb Law Faculty, she had an exceptionally distinguished career. After working as a corporate lawyer, she was appointed Judge at the early age of 31 to the Primary Court for Labour-related litigation in Varaždin,where she worked for ten years. She was President of the Court up to the time it was dissolved in 1990. She went on to distinguished posts in the fields of financial and banking law. Among her many significant achievements she was involved in setting up Varaždin's capital market and projects for establishing the capital market in Croatia as a whole, from legislation to founding investment funds. She was a member of the directorate of the central Croatian Chamber of Commerce, which was the first Croatian institution to achieve EU standards well in advance of Croatia's accession. A native of Zagreb, Nada has lived mainly in Varaždin, but has been coming to Hvar Island since her childhood. Now in retirement, she is increasingly spending time in her home in Jelsa. She enjoys devoting time to gardening and looking after cats and dogs according to need. As a founder-member of Eco Hvar, Nada was designated the Charity's honorary legal and financial adviser.

VIVIAN GRISOGONO (MA Oxon), founder member and Eco Hvar's President, worked as a Chartered Physiotherapist in the United Kingdom for over 27 years, specializing in trauma and sports injuries, but also treating patients with chronic conditions, including stroke and heart attack victims, rheumatoid arthritis sufferers and anorexics. Her personal website is www.viviangrisogono.com. As a health worker she is concerned about the environment, because poor environmental management can have - and is having - disastrous effects on our wellbeing. Being a lifelong animal lover, she has always been actively engaged in animal welfare. Having first visited Hvar in about 1968, she moved to the island permanently in 2004. She is on the Management Committee for the European Foundation for Philanthropy and Social Development, and for LAG Škoji (Local Action Group - Islands)

DEBORA BUNČUGA, Eco Hvar's Secretary, has three children. She was elected to the Steering Committee as representative and Secretary for the Charity and signatory for its Bank transactions and other financial documentation at the 4th Annual General Meeting held on 17th June 2017. She is a lifelong animal lover, dedicated to helping animals in need (as is her sister Daniela Lučić, who is also an Eco Hvar Supporter). Apart from her busy family life, Debora is a leading light in Jelsa's social activities, notably the „Karnevol“ organization (Facebook page, in Croatian), which is part of the lifeblood animating the local winter scene.

MARIJA BUNČUGA was elected to the Steering Committee as a representative of the Charity and signatory to the Charity's financial documents at the Extraordinary Meeting held on 22nd February 2019. Born and raised in Jelsa, after finishing high school she went to Zagreb for her studies, graduating in 2001 from the Faculty of Economics. After that she returned to live in Jelsa. She is married and has two children. She has a lifelong love of animals and nature, and spends all her free time in her garden, where she grows flowers, fruit and vegetables organically. She is an active member of the „Karnevol“ organization (Facebook page, in Croatian), and the Association of Hvar Wineries. 

DINKA BARBIĆ was elected to the Steering Committee as a representative of the Charity and signatory to the Charity's financial documents at the 2018 Annual General Meeting, held on June 24th 2019. She was born in Washington, U.S.A., where she spent her early and middle childhood, after which she lived in Zagreb until her mid-20’s. Having always loved Jelsa, which she considered her true home, she finally came to live there in 2005. Her greatest wish is to pass on to her kids her love of the place and her awareness of what a privilege it is to live in such a beautiful environment. She would also like to help achieve change on the island, being aware that all too often it is in the islanders' mindset to take Nature for granted, instead of appreciating the beauty and riches in their surroundings and learning to cherish them.

FORMER COMMITTEE MEMBER

MIRANDA MILIČIĆ BRADBURY, founder member and formerly Charity Secretary, has two small children, and so has a keen interest in health and the environment. She studied law, and now works in tourism. She is a skilled photographer, and also very adept at handicrafts. She is particularly good at constructing magically imaginative carnival costumes for the children out of the simplest materials. A native of Jelsa, Miranda cares deeply for the wellbeing of Hvar Island. After moving to Varaždin, she resigned her position on the Committee, even though she retained her strong interest in the wellbeing of her native island. All members of Eco Hvar remain grateful to her for her invaluable help in launching the Charity to its successful start over its first formative years. 

 

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