About Us

THE CHARITY'S DETAILS:

  

ECO HVAR, UDRUGA ZA DOBROBIT LJUDI, ŽIVOTINJA I OKOLIŠA OTOKA HVARA
(A not-for-profit organization for the wellbeing of people, animals and the environment on the Island of Hvar)
Registered address: Pitve 93, 21465 Jelsa, Hrvatska / Croatia
OIB (tax identity number): 14009858487
General registration number (matični broj): 04089316
Number on the Register of not-for-profit organizations (broj iz matičnog registra): 17004814.
(Old RNO number 0254098)

BANK DETAILS

Privredna Banka Zagreb d.d.
Poslovnica 220 Pjaca, Pjaca 1
21465 Jelsa, Croatia
IBAN: HR37 2340 0091 1106 0678 6 (Account number)
SWIFT CODE: PBZGHR2X
Account name: ECO HVAR
Address of account holder: Pitve 93, 21465 Jelsa, Croatia

o-nama

COMMITTEE MEMBERS, CHARITY REPRESENTATIVES:

NADA KOZULIĆ, the Charity's Vice President, is a lawyer by profession. From being a prize-winning student at the Zagreb Law Faculty, she had an exceptionally distinguished career. After working as a corporate lawyer, she was appointed Judge at the early age of 31 to the Primary Court for Labour-related litigation in Varaždin,where she worked for ten years. She was President of the Court up to the time it was dissolved in 1990. She went on to distinguished posts in the fields of financial and banking law. Among her many significant achievements she was involved in setting up Varaždin's capital market and projects for establishing the capital market in Croatia as a whole, from legislation to founding investment funds. She was a member of the directorate of the central Croatian Chamber of Commerce, which was the first Croatian institution to achieve EU standards well in advance of Croatia's accession. A native of Zagreb, Nada has lived mainly in Varaždin, but has been coming to Hvar Island since her childhood. Now in retirement, she is increasingly spending time in her home in Jelsa. She enjoys devoting time to gardening and looking after cats and dogs according to need. As a founder-member of Eco Hvar, Nada was designated the Charity's honorary legal and financial adviser.

VIVIAN GRISOGONO (MA Oxon), founder member and Eco Hvar's President, worked as a Chartered Physiotherapist in the United Kingdom for over 27 years, specializing in trauma and sports injuries, but also treating patients with chronic conditions, including stroke and heart attack victims, rheumatoid arthritis sufferers and anorexics. Her personal website is www.viviangrisogono.com. As a health worker she is concerned about the environment, because poor environmental management can have - and is having - disastrous effects on our wellbeing. Being a lifelong animal lover, she has always been actively engaged in animal welfare. Having first visited Hvar in about 1968, she moved to the island permanently in 2004. She is on the Management Committee for the European Foundation for Philanthropy and Social Development, and for LAG Škoji (Local Action Group - Islands)

DEBORA BUNČUGA, Eco Hvar's Secretary, has three children. She was elected to the Steering Committee as representative and Secretary for the Charity and signatory for its Bank transactions and other financial documentation at the 4th Annual General Meeting held on 17th June 2017. She is a lifelong animal lover, dedicated to helping animals in need (as is her sister Daniela Lučić, who is also an Eco Hvar Supporter). Apart from her busy family life, Debora is a leading light in Jelsa's social activities, notably the „Karnevol“ organization (Facebook page, in Croatian), which is part of the lifeblood animating the local winter scene.

MARIJA BUNČUGA was elected to the Steering Committee as a representative of the Charity and signatory to the Charity's financial documents at the Extraordinary Meeting held on 22nd February 2019. Born and raised in Jelsa, after finishing high school she went to Zagreb for her studies, graduating in 2001 from the Faculty of Economics. After that she returned to live in Jelsa. She is married and has two children. She has a lifelong love of animals and nature, and spends all her free time in her garden, where she grows flowers, fruit and vegetables organically. She is an active member of the „Karnevol“ organization (Facebook page, in Croatian), and the Association of Hvar Wineries. 

DINKA BARBIĆ was elected to the Steering Committee as a representative of the Charity and signatory to the Charity's financial documents at the 2018 Annual General Meeting, held on June 24th 2019. She was born in Washington, U.S.A., where she spent her early and middle childhood, after which she lived in Zagreb until her mid-20’s. Having always loved Jelsa, which she considered her true home, she finally came to live there in 2005. Her greatest wish is to pass on to her kids her love of the place and her awareness of what a privilege it is to live in such a beautiful environment. She would also like to help achieve change on the island, being aware that all too often it is in the islanders' mindset to take Nature for granted, instead of appreciating the beauty and riches in their surroundings and learning to cherish them.

FORMER COMMITTEE MEMBER

MIRANDA MILIČIĆ BRADBURY, founder member and formerly Charity Secretary, has two small children, and so has a keen interest in health and the environment. She studied law, and now works in tourism. She is a skilled photographer, and also very adept at handicrafts. She is particularly good at constructing magically imaginative carnival costumes for the children out of the simplest materials. A native of Jelsa, Miranda cares deeply for the wellbeing of Hvar Island. After moving to Varaždin, she resigned her position on the Committee, even though she retained her strong interest in the wellbeing of her native island. All members of Eco Hvar remain grateful to her for her invaluable help in launching the Charity to its successful start over its first formative years. 

 

You are here: Home About Us

Eco Environment News feeds

  • Researchers say loss of 1.9m square kilometres of intact ecosystems will have ‘profound implications’ for biodiversity

    Wilderness across the planet is disappearing on a huge scale, according to a new study that found human activities had converted an area the size of Mexico from virtually intact natural landscapes to heavily modified ones in just 13 years.

    The loss of 1.9m square kilometres (735,000 sq miles) of intact ecosystems would have “profound implications” for the planet’s biodiversity, the study’s authors said.

    Continue reading...

  • I understand the temptation to feel that what is wrong now will be wrong forever. But anguish and hope can coexist

    If you’re heartsore at the quadruple crisis of the mismanaged pandemic, the resultant financial catastrophe grinding down so many people, the climate chaos dramatically evident in unprecedented fires in the west, hurricanes in the southeast, and melting ice in Greenland and the poles, and the corruption, human rights abuses, and creeping authoritarianism of the current regime, you’re not alone.

    Related:Wealth of US billionaires rises by nearly a third during pandemic

    Continue reading...

  • Glen Feshie, Cairngorms:These trees are the remnants of a coniferous rainforest that spread across Britain after the last ice age

    Light brightens the tent and nudges me out of sleep. Dawn must have arrived. I open my eyes, expecting morning light, but instead see soft silver shapes flickering across the tent fabric – moonbeams, diffused through the swaying limbs of the huge Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) under which my tent is pitched.

    My watch says 3.34am. I unzip the door of the tent and look outside. The previous day was overcast, but the weather is restless and squally, and the wind has torn open a rift in the clouds. The moon is startling in its unsullied brightness. Metallic light plays across the dark forest. Blaeberry and heather bushes, wet with rain, gleam in the lunar glow. Moonlit scraps of cloud drift across the sky like smoke.

    Continue reading...

  • The best wildlife pictures from around the world, from golden frogs to homebound birds

    Continue reading...

  • For decades David Attenborough delighted millions with tales of life on Earth. But now the broadcaster wants us to face up to the state of the planet

    Sir David Attenborough’s soothing, matter-of-fact narrations have brought the natural world to our living rooms for nearly seven decades and counting. From Australia’s Great Barrier Reef to the jungles of central Africa, the 94-year-old broadcaster has dazzled and delighted millions with tales of life on Earth – mostly pristine and untouched, according to the images on our screens. But this autumn Attenborough has returned with a different message: nature is collapsing around us.

    “We are facing a crisis. One that has consequences for us all. It threatens our ability to feed ourselves, to control our climate. It even puts us at greater risk of pandemic diseases such as Covid-19,” he warned in Extinction: The Facts on BBC One primetime, receiving five-star reviews.

    Continue reading...

  • Wild Justice accuses UK government of breaching duty to protect conservation sites

    Conservationists are suing the UK government over the release of millions of game birds on to land that is home to rare and threatened species.

    The campaign group Wild Justice has accused ministers of breaching their legal duties to protect sites of high conservation value in England by failing to control the use of large areas of countryside to shoot pheasant and red-legged partridge for sport.

    Continue reading...

  • Beach clean organiser wants to assess amount of masks and gloves discarded during coronavirus crisis

    Volunteers in this year’s Great British Beach Clean are being asked to record the personal protective equipment (PPE) they find, to get a clearer picture of the volume of plastic masks and gloves discarded during the coronavirus pandemic and their impact on the environment.

    The Marine Conservation Society (MCS), which organises the annual September event, is urging people to organise their own surveys with smaller groups of friends, family and “bubbles”, in line with government guidance.

    Continue reading...

  • About 40% of the Tiehm’s buckwheat population destroyed, amid fierce dispute over proposed lithium and boron mine nearby

    Nestled among the slopes of Nevada’s Silver Peak Range are six patches of Tiehm’s buckwheat, a rare flowering plant found nowhere else in the world. Only an estimated 42,000 plants remain on 10 acres. But over the weekend, conservationists discovered that 40% of the total population had been destroyed.

    Related:Chinese fishing armada plundered waters around Galápagos, data shows

    Continue reading...

  • Data reveals just 14% of good ecological standard and none of good chemical standard

    All English rivers have failed to meet quality tests for pollution amid concerns over the scale of sewage discharges and agricultural and industrial chemicals entering the water system.

    Data published on Thursday reveals just 14% of English rivers are of good ecological standard, a rating that suggests they are as close to their natural state as possible.

    Continue reading...

  • Hundreds of vessels caught logging 73,000 hours of fishing in just one month in new analysis

    A vast fishing armada of Chinese vessels just off the Galápagos Islands logged an astounding 73,000 hours of fishing during just one month as it pulled up thousands of tonnes of squid and fish, a new report based on data analysis has found.

    The discovery of the giant flotilla off the archipelago that inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution stirred controversy and outrage in Ecuador and abroad.

    Continue reading...

Eco Health News feeds

Eco Nature News feeds

Feed not found.