Help for a 'stray' cat

Published in Forum items

My friend and I visited Hvar over the weekend. During our stay we met a street cat that we grew very attached of each other. 

It sounds crazy but I am looking for options to adopt her. I did a bit of research and came across Eco-Hvar. After reading a few articles I realized we are not only tourists compassionate about these strayed animals, and there are successful stories of non-local adopting animals from Hvar. This has lighten my hope and I really appreciated you guys put up these articles. I live in Germany and I am writing to you in hope that you can give me some help or point me to the right direction. I am willing to go back to Hvar and bring the cat back with me but without  local’s help it would be extremely difficult. If Eco-Har is willing to help please let me know. In return I would like to help Eco-Hvar to continue works for the good cause. We can discuss this in details.

The cat roams on Ivana Bozitkovica a lot. She can usually be seen before noon and after dark. She is very vocal when she sees people she would come out and greet them. I’ve attached a few pictures of her.
VL, Germany, e-mail January 6th 2015

Eco Hvar's Response: How very kind of you to want to help this beautiful cat. She is obviously very tame, and used to people.

The process of adopting is very simple: she needs to go to the vet to have the vaccinations and get a pet passport, then she can leave the country. The vet is in Stari Grad, and is well experienced in these formalities.

My one query is, are you sure this cat is a stray? She looks quite well fed, and may have an owner - or even several. It is common for cats to look to other people to provide food for them, even when they are perfectly well fed by their owner(s). I know mine do, and I understand that for them it is a safety net, in case for some reason I disappear or stop feeding them.

If you are sure, having asked around, that the cat has no owner, then there is no problem with you coming back for a few days and sorting out the export necessities. If you are not sure, we would need to try to check on the cat and see if the neighbours can tell us about it.
Eco Hvar e-mail January 6th 2015

You are right. I asked the owner of my short stay and she confirmed the cat belongs to one of her neighbors. I am glad you brought this up. I almost stole someone’s pet! Knowing she has an owner puts my mind at ease, and I learned something valuable through you guys, too!

VL e-mail January 7th 2015

A good outcome! We are delighted that this story has a happy sequel. Some cats need to stay in their own environment, others, like Stella, the cat which went from Hvar Island to Canada, are best off finding a new life elsewhere. Eco Hvar is extremely grateful to all the people, locals and visitors, who want to make life better for the animals. Vivian Grisogono, President Eco Hvar
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