Highlights

Highlights

Insect Spraying: Open Letter to Jelsa Council

Published in Highlights

An open letter to Jelsa Council authorities about unacceptable practices related to the Insect Suppression Programme,

Saint John Paul II: relics on Hvar!

Published in Highlights

In an event of huge significance to the Catholic population of the island, relics of St. John Paul II were brought to the parishes of Vrisnik and Pitve in September 2021, thanks to parish priest Don Robert Bartoszek.

Jelsa's Digital Nomads

Published in Highlights

Jessica Romano and Thibaud Duprat settled in Jelsa as remote workers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Birds, Bee-eaters, Devastation, Conservation, Tourism

Published in Highlights

Hvar's natural environment is its greatest asset, for those who live on the island and its visitors.

Croatia, Beloved Country

Published in Highlights

"My connection to Croatia is unbreakable. I feel it as a cord of turquoise and rosemary and cicadas and curry plants, from my heart to that island. I feel blessed every single day to have Croatia in my heart."

Hvar's children excel, Eco Hvar benefits!

Published in Highlights

Children who care make a BIG difference to the world around them. It is great to find them on Hvar.

Tourism is people

Published in Highlights

From the 1960s, package tourism was the mainstay of the trade on the Croatian coast (which was then part of now-defunct Yugoslavia).

A different kind of tourist attraction

Published in Highlights

On Tuesday 16th July, the Ultra festival descended on Hvar, whose long-suffering citizens braced themselves for the event.

Eco-friendly accommodation on Hvar!

Published in Highlights

Ecobnb is an initiative for the 'new' age of growing environmental awareness.

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Eco Environment News feeds

  • Exclusive: A further 35,000 flights have operated almost empty, with climate campaigners calling the revelations ‘shocking’

    More than 5,000 completely empty passenger flights have flown to or from UK airports since 2019, the Guardian can reveal.

    A further 35,000 commercial flights have operated almost empty since 2019, with fewer than 10% of seats filled, according to analysis of data from the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). This makes a total of about 40,000 “ghost flights”.

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  • State of the World’s Birds report warns human actions and climate crisis putting 49% in decline, with one in eight bird species under threat of extinction

    Nearly half of the planet’s bird species are in decline, according to a definitive report that paints the grimmest picture yet of the destruction of avian life.

    The State of the World’s Birds report, which is released every four years by BirdLife International, shows that the expansion and intensification of agriculture is putting pressure on 73% of species. Logging, invasive species, exploitation of natural resources and climate breakdown are the other main threats.

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  • Unlike most of the media, the Guardian resists political or commercial influence in order to keep the climate crisis front and centre

    What is salient is not important. What is important is not salient. Most of the time, most of the media obsess over issues of mind-numbing triviality. Much of the world’s political journalism is little more than court gossip: who’s in, who’s out, who said what to whom. At the same time, issues of immense, even existential importance are largely or entirely ignored.

    With the exception of all-out nuclear war, all the most important problems that confront us are environmental. None of our hopes, none of our dreams, none of our plans and expectations can survive the loss of a habitable planet. And there is scarcely an Earth system that is not now threatened with collapse.

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  • Exclusive: Birkbeck, University of London, is first institution to blacklist firms ‘most responsible for destroying the planet’

    Fossil fuel companies have been banned from recruiting students through a university careers service for the first time. The new policy from Birkbeck, University of London, states its careers service “will not hold relationships of any kind with oil, gas or mining companies”.

    The decision follows a campaign, supported by the student-led group People & Planet, to cut off recruitment pathways to fossil fuel companies. The campaign is now active in dozens of UK universities.

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  • There are many reasons to suggest a deal to save the natural world is possible in Montreal, if division can be overcome and the Brazilian president doesn’t cause problems

    We are at the beginning of a busy end to the year. The summer holidays are over in the northern hemisphere, the world economy is creaking into recession, war is raging in Ukraine and there is the small matter of the most important biodiversity conference in more than a decade: Cop15.

    Money will ultimately decide the fate of the summit and the ambition of the final text in Montreal this December, as will the mood after the climate Cop27, which ends two weeks earlier.

    In a series of dispatches ahead of the Cop15 UN biodiversity conference in Montreal in December, we will be hearing from a secret negotiator who is from a developing country involved in the post-2020 global biodiversity framework negotiations.

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  • Corporate bonds intended to inject liquidity into markets profited companies engaged in deforestation

    Some of the world’s biggest central banks are unwittingly helping to finance agri-business giants engaged in the destruction of the Brazilian Amazon, according to a report published on Wednesday.

    The Bank of England, the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank are among the institutions that have bought millions of dollars in bonds issued by companies linked to deforestation and land-grabbing, according to the report Bankrolling Destruction, published by the rights group Global Witness.

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  • RSPB, National Trust and others call on supporters to write to MPs as they argue ‘nature is not a negotiable luxury’

    Environmental charities are mobilising their millions of members to take on the UK government over what they say is an attack on nature in the push for growth.

    Groups including the RSPB, the National Trust, the Wildlife Trusts, and Wildlife and Countryside link are encouraging supporters to put pressure on Conservative MPs over proposals that they say strike at the heart of environmental and wildlife protections.

    The removal from the statute books of 570 laws derived from EU directives that make up the bedrock of environmental regulations in the UK, covering sewage pollution, water quality and clean air. These include the habitat regulations, which have protected areas for wildlife for more than 30 years.

    The ending of the moratorium on fracking.

    The creation of low-tax investment zones from Cornwall to Cumbria where environmental protections would be relaxed to encourage development.

    The feared scrapping of the post-Brexit environmental land management scheme (Elms), which pays farmers to enhance nature.

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  • The last 12 months have produced alarming incidents of extreme weather across the globe, leading to serious ripple effects, from energy shortages to severe food insecurity. Guardian journalists are prioritising this foremost crisis of our times

    This year will be remembered as a watershed year for the escalating climate crisis. Dozens of countries have been hit by extreme weather so far in 2022. Millions have been driven from their homes by flood, fire or drought, while food and energy shortages are becoming acute in many regions.

    Increasingly, extreme weather events are being caused by climate breakdown. The Guardian’s global team of environment reporters have covered the events – and their impact – around the world, around the clock. In the past year, we published almost 4,000 articles on the climate crisis, read by more than 65 million people, not to mention podcasts, live events and masterclasses.

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  • Too many technical difficulties to overcome to make it a viable low-carbon heating fuel, say researchers

    Hydrogen is unsuitable for use in home heating, and likely to remain so, despite the hopes of the UK government and plumbing industry, a comprehensive review of scientific papers has concluded.

    Hydrogen lobbyists are out in force at the Labour party conference this week, sponsoring several events in Liverpool, and will be plentiful at the Conservative party conference that begins this weekend.

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  • Seagrown, the UK’s largest seaweed farm, is one of the projects driving the region’s plan to tackle the climate crisis

    To the passing seagull, it doesn’t look like much: a few buoys bobbing about in the North Sea, four miles off Scarborough harbour. But the buoys mark the next frontier in UK farming and an initiative that could help North Yorkshire become the first carbon-negative region in England.

    Thirty-five metres beneath the waves is the UK’s largest offshore seaweed farm, a 10-hectare (25-acre) patch of ocean managed by a company called Seagrown, started four years ago by a marine chemist, Laura Robinson, and Wave Crookes, an aptly named local trawlerman turned mariner. In 2015 they met and fell in love working on a British Antarctic Survey icebreaker and resolved to return to the UK to develop a form of “regenerative, restorative” industry.

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