Asparagus feast for a good cause

Published in Highlights

Asparagus was the focus of an unusual charitable event in Hvar Town.

Maja Budrović and Damir Carić Maja Budrović and Damir Carić Photo: Mirko Crnčević

April is the time to enjoy fresh asparagus on Hvar. Damir Carić is the President of the Hvar Lions' Club. He also cultivates organic asparagus. This year, he was the diriving force behind a novel event, a feast based on asparagus, under the title 'Hvarska šparogijada'. On Saturday 9th April 2016, the Lions' Club and the Hvar Red Cross Association hosted an opulent lunch featuring no less than 20 asparagus dishes, cooked by an elite team of some of Hvar's most notable chefs: Damir Čavić, Marinko Jurić, Ivo Buzolić-Lojko, Petar Hure, Karlo Trogrlić and Marino Radojković with the team of cooks from Hvar's Hotel Palace. The meal was made complete with a selection of cakes and a choice of alcoholic or soft drinks. Damir Carić donated an astonishing 80 kg of asparagus. Prized Hvar wines were donated by Paveto Petrić from Stari Grad, Andrija Carić of the Svirče Cooperative, Andro Tomić from Jelsa, as well as Lions' Club members Antun Tonči Ščepanović and Nikola Karković-Trentin.

The event, which was supported by Hvar Town, the 'Sunčani Hvar' hotel firm, and the Hvar Rotarians, took place in the Loggia of the Hotel Palace, one of Hvar's prime venues. Music was provided by Hvar's female a cappella group, Klapa 'Bodulke'. For 70 kunas the 200 or so participants had a full meal with drinks, and there was also a prize lottery at 10 kunas a ticket. There were also speeches. Damir Carić paid fulsome tribute to the expertise and heroic efforts of the team of chefs The President of all Croatia's Lions' Clubs, Dražen Melčić, described the work of the organization locally and internationally. Both speakers welcomed special guest Dr. Borben Uglešić, a well-respected psychiatrist in Split, who is a father-figure to the Hvar Lions' Club.

All the proceeds from the event are to be devoted to helping two needy island residents, one Frančeska from Hvar Town, and Dragica from Stari Grad. The Hvar Red Cross Association, headed by Maja Budrović, works tirelessly to help islanders of all ages who have special needs, whether temporary or long-term. Its work is receognized and honoured by fundraising events such as the 'Šparogijada'. This inaugural event was such a success that the consensus was that it should be repeated annually. There are always deserving causes in need of help on the island. It is truly heartening to find such a level of selfless goodwill ready to offer that help. Congratulations to all concerned!

You are here: Home highlights Asparagus feast for a good cause

Eco Environment News feeds

  • Cactus flowers, a former circus bear and a baby elephant are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world

    Continue reading...

  • Research programme will send aerosol injections into the earth’s upper atmosphere to study the risks and benefits of a future solar tech-fix for climate change

    US scientists are set to send aerosol injections 20km up into the earth’s stratosphere in the world’s biggest solar geoengineering programme to date, to study the potential of a future tech-fix for global warming.

    Continue reading...

  • Malaysian activist Bill Kayong fought to save forest lands from logging and oil palm development. Like a troubling number of environmental campaigners around the world, he paid the highest price, reports Yale Environment 360

    Environmentalists at risk: read part one in this series

    It was 8.20am on 21 June 2016. Bill Kayong, an up-and-coming political activist in Miri, a coastal oil town in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, was 15 minutes into his morning commute, waiting in his pickup truck at a traffic light across from a shopping mall. Suddenly, two bullets shattered the side window and struck him in the head, killing him instantly.

    Kayong was one of dozens of people killed while defending environmental and human rights causes in 2016. His life was taken just one day after a report from the human rights group Global Witness revealed that the previous year had been “the worst on record for killings of land and environmental defenders”, with 185 people around the world killed while taking a stand against development projects ranging from dams, to mines, to logging, to agricultural plantations.

    Continue reading...

  • Collection will help scientists piece together a large branch of insects’ family tree and be a resource for scientists who study natural controls on the environment

    In two rooms of Charles and Lois O’Brien’s modest home in Tucson, Arizona, more than a million insects – a collection worth an estimated $10m – rest in tombs of glass and homemade shelving. They come from every continent and corner of the world, gathered over almost six decades; a bug story that began as a love story.

    This week, the O’Briens, both octogenarians, announced that they would donate their collection, one of the world’s largest private holdings, to Arizona State University.

    Continue reading...

  • Meteorologists have consulted the International Cloud Atlas since the 19th century – now, updated with crowd-sourced images and newly categorised formations such as wave-like asperitas, it’s going online. Readers have been sharing their images via GuardianWitness

    Continue reading...

  • President ushers in ‘new era of American energy policy’ Friday as environmental activists denounce revived oil pipeline as a ‘disaster for the planet’

    Donald Trump announced a “new era of American energy policy” as he signed the presidential permit allowing TransCanada to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

    “It’s going to be an incredible pipeline. Greatest technology known to man. Or woman. And frankly, we’re very proud of it,” said Trump in the Oval Office on Friday morning.

    Continue reading...

  • Exclusive: Draft regulations seen by the Guardian reveal the European commission wants to prohibit the insecticides that cause ‘acute risks to bees’

    The world’s most widely used insecticides would be banned from all fields across Europe under draft regulations from the European commission, seen by the Guardian.

    The documents are the first indication that the powerful commission wants a complete ban and cite “high acute risks to bees”. A ban could be in place this year if the proposals are approved by a majority of EU member states.

    Continue reading...

  • A plan to halve carbon emissions every decade, while green energy continues to double every five years, provides a simple but rigorous roadmap to tackle climate change, scientists say

    A new “carbon law”, modelled on Moore’s law in computing, has been proposed as a roadmap for beating climate change. It sees carbon emissions halving every decade, while green energy continues to double every five years.

    The carbon law’s proponents are senior climate-change scientists and they argue it provides a simple, broad but quantitative plan that could drive governments and businesses to make urgently needed carbon cuts, particularly at a time when global warming is falling off the global political agenda.

    Continue reading...

  • Extent of ice over North pole has fallen to a new wintertime low, for the third year in a row, as climate change drives freakish weather

    The extent of Arctic ice has fallen to a new wintertime low, as climate change drives freakishly high temperatures in the polar regions.

    The ice cap grows during the winter months and usually reaches its maximum in early March. But the 2017 maximum was 14.4m sq km, lower than any year in the 38-year satellite record, according to researchers at the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC) and Nasa.

    Continue reading...

  • Massive fine reflects change in sentencing as previously low penalties failed to deter water firms from polluting England’s rivers and beaches

    Thames Water has been hit with a record fine of £20.3m after huge leaks of untreated sewage into the Thames and its tributaries and on to land, including the popular Thames path. The prolonged leaks led to serious impacts on residents, farmers, and wildlife, killing birds and fish.

    The fine imposed on Wednesday was for numerous offences in 2013 and 2014 at sewage treatment works at Aylesbury, Didcot, Henley and Little Marlow, and a large sewage pumping station at Littlemore.

    Continue reading...

Eco Health News feeds

Eco Nature News feeds