Jelsa welcomes Premier Plenković

Published in Highlights

Premier Andrej Plenković visited Jelsa on its special Council Day celebrating the Feast of the Assumption.

Premier Andrej Plenković with Anita Drinković Premier Andrej Plenković with Anita Drinković Photo: Vivian Grisogono

The Catholic Feast of Our Lady's Assumption, which celebrates the transition of Jesus' Mother Mary to Heaven, is called 'Vela Gospa' in Croatian. It is traditionally celebrated on August 15th each year, and is a national holiday throughout Croatia. Jelsa's main church is dedicated as the Church of Our Lady's Assumption, so the Feast is of special significance to the town.

Jelsa Council hangs out the flags for its Feast Day. Photo: Vivian Grisogono

Each year there is a special open Council meeting, followed by the obligatory refreshments, which no self-respecting Croatian celebration can do without.

Andrej Plenković with Jelsa's favourite son, Frank John Duboković, July 2014. Photo: Vivian Grisogono

As usual, this year's Council celebration was held on August 14th, so as not to interfere with the major church activities which fill most of the day on the 15th. Guest of honour was Croatia's Prime Minister. Andrej Plenković, whose family originates from Svirče, so he has specially close ties to our locality. Jelsa's amiable and dynamic Mayor, Nikša Peronja, belongs to the Social Democratic Party (SDP), while the Prime Minister heads the rival Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ), but as both men are sociable and urbane, no political tensions are allowed to mar any occasion when they get together, formally or informally.

Premier's party marching on. Photo: Vivian Grisogono

Andrej Plenković's visits to Jelsa have always been relaxed. While he was a Member of the European Parliament, he was happy to sit in Jelsa's famed cafes and pass pleasantries with the locals. Now that he is Prime Minister, his visits to Jelsa tend to be more formal. Not quite suit-and-tie level in the sweltering August weather, but de rigueur smart trousers and shirt. And of course a security detail around him, even if the officers are discreetly dressed in mufti.

Premier Plenković: informal. Photo: Vivian Grisogono

Yet there is still a pleasant atmosphere of informality. After the official celebrations in the Town Hall, the premier and his close friends and associates made their way to greet people in selected cafes, before settling down at the 'Pjaca' for coffee and a chat.

Greeting Eco Hvar. Photo: Vivian Grisogono

On his walkabout, Premier Plenković graciously paid Eco Hvar a compliment. Reaching out to shake hands, he said 'Odličan portal!' ('Excellent website!') . A very welcome surprise! Our work this year has intensified. It is clear that the need for animal shelters for dogs and cats on the island has never been greater. Ditto the need to persuade individuals that pesticides are bad for everyone's health and wellbeing. Equally importantly, we hope to bring about change in the local policy of spraying insecticides around the streets during the summer, a practice we consider irresponsible, unnecessary and downright dangerous. So we welcome support and encouragement, and we hope that others in positions of authority, whatever their political party, will follow the Premier's lead in appreciating the work we do and the projects we are hoping to realise.

© Vivian Grisogono MA(Oxon) 2017

 

You are here: Home highlights Jelsa welcomes Premier Plenković

Eco Environment News feeds

  • The wolf is considered a threat to our way of farming, but our fear may be misplaced. Perhaps predators are needed to bring nature back into balance

    There’s a monument near Brora, 60 miles short of John o’Groats, that claims to mark the spot where the last wolf in Sutherland was killed. I pass it often in the car. The wolf, it says, was killed by the hunter Polson in or about the year 1700.

    I know this story. Polson, so it goes, was standing watch outside the wolf’s lair while his sons laid waste to the pups inside. When the she-wolf returned from the hunt, racing to the aid of her young, she bounded past the hunter and, as she did, he grabbed her by the tail. From inside the den – now plunged into darkness as Polson and the wolf struggled at its entrance – came, in Gaelic, a shout of alarm: “Father! What’s blocking the light?” To which Polson replied: “If the tail comes away at the root, you’ll soon find out!”

    Continue reading...

  • Mollusc’s neurons located in body and arms enable complex work independent of central brain

    One of the most remarkable creatures on the planet is the common octopus, or Octopusvulgaris,which is now well established in UK waters as our seas warm because of the climate crisis. It has three hearts, and eight limbs with 200 suckers that can feel, taste and smell its surroundings. Scientists remain divided over whether it has one brain or nine. In mammals, most neurons are in the brain, but with octopuses, two-thirds are in their body and arms, enabling each arm to do complex tasks, such as opening jars to obtain food, apparently independently from the central brain.

    After much experimenting with underwater mazes and other contraptions, scientists concluded that octopuses could solve various problems with one limb and then communicate the experience to other arms via the central brain.

    Continue reading...

  • Pollutants from farming, heating and vehicles beyond levels needed to ensure breathable air

    Governments across Europe are failing to protect their citizens from toxic air pollution, with most Europeans still breathing filthy air in their cities, according to data.

    Pollutants from farming, domestic heating and vehicles are beyond the levels needed to ensure breathable air within World Health Organization guidelines, despite EU legislation, government pledges and years of campaigning.

    Continue reading...

  • The company involved says it does not expect the fish to damage the environment, but others disagree

    An outbreak of 50,000 Tasmanian farmed salmon could potentially “pollute” the marine environment, according to local environmentalists.

    The fish rushed to freedom after a fire melted part of their enclosure on Monday morning, and while the company involved said it did not expect the fugitive fish to damage the environment, others disagree.

    Continue reading...

  • Drop in emissions this year is a ‘tiny blip’ in buildup of greenhouse gases, UN agency says

    Climate-heating gases have reached record levels in the atmosphere despite the global lockdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the UN’s World Meteorological Organization has said.

    There is estimated to have been a cut in emissions of between 4.2% and 7.5% in 2020 due to the shutdown of travel and other activities. But the WMO said this was a “tiny blip” in the continuous buildup of greenhouse gases in the air caused by human activities, and less than the natural variation seen year to year.

    Continue reading...

  • Group stages debt and tax strikes to expose ‘political economy’s complicity’ in ecological crisis

    Extinction Rebellion is launching a campaign of financial civil disobedience aimed at exposing the “political economy’s complicity” in the unfolding ecological crisis.

    The group – which has staged some of the UK’s biggest civil disobedience protests over the past two years – is turning its attention to what it says will be a sustained campaign of debt and tax strikes. It is also asking people to “redirect” loans from banks that finance fossil fuel projects to frontline organisations fighting for climate justice.

    Continue reading...

  • London and the south-east received 45% of new charger capacity in the past year, analysis shows

    London and the south-east have benefited disproportionately from the installation of new electric car charge points in the last year, amid a push to be ready the UK for the ban on internal combustion engine cars in 2030.

    The two regions together received 45% of new charger capacity in the year to October, well in excess of their 27% share of the population, according to a Guardian analysis of Zap Map data which shows charging points across the UK published by the Department for Transport.

    Continue reading...

  • The population of shortfin mako, mainly caught as bycatch but also prized by sports fishermen, is facing an alarming decline

    Conservationists accused the EU and the US at negotiations of Atlantic fishing nations this week of blocking urgently needed plans to protect the world’s fastest shark species.

    The strength and speed of the shortfin mako, which can swim up to 43mph, makes it a target for sports fishermen, particularly in the US, while its highly prized meat and fins have led to the shark being overfished globally – and dangerously so in the north Atlantic.

    Continue reading...

  • Three commoners explain why keeping 1,000-year-old farming practices alive is worth more than money

    Photographs by Peter Flude

    A five-inch stack of old Telegraph newspapers is perched on the front seat of the bashed-up Subaru, while in the back is a long stick for fending off cows. At the wheel is Ann Sevier, a 13th generation commoner whose family has lived in the New Forest since 1650.

    “Hello everybody!” she yells to the livestock as she pulls up in the car. We are in Latchmore valley near Fordingbridge, where more than a hundred cows and horses have gathered in the cool breeze that tumbles off the surrounding hills, providing respite from biting insects (behaviour known locally as “shading”). It resembles a congregation of animals you might see around a waterhole, except the horses have letters branded on their backs.

    Continue reading...

  • Parents and grandparents are the most likely to try to minimise their environmental footprint

    Young people are often dubbed “Generation Green” – millennials and teenagers championing climate action and environmental values, often with a well-aimed dig at older generations who have failed to prevent a climate catastrophe.

    Yet it is their baby boomer parents and grandparents who are most likely to act in support of green issues, according to a national survey.

    Continue reading...

Eco Health News feeds

Eco Nature News feeds

Feed not found.