Stray cat in Hvar Town

Published in Forum items

We are currently visiting your lovely island and are staying in the Amfora Hotel. Since our arrival we have fallen in love with a beautiful stray young cat.

She seems to spend the majority of her time down by the main harbour area (she sleeps behind the stalls underneath the palm trees, diagonally across from Split Bank). She's jet black all over with a pointed face and eyes and nose resembling a Siamese breed. She's so very thin and malnourished and we have been feeding her and looking after her as best we can during the time we have been here. We were delighted when we found your website, just moments ago. As a tourists, we have been hopeful that an organisation such as yours would exist. I've read about some of your work, your hopes and aspirations for the future. We feel powerless to do very much at all to help the little cat we've fallen in love with.  Can you provide us with any guidance or information as to how we can support the cat?
One question might be, should we enquire about taking her home? Would this be possible? Do you know of anyone who has done this before?
Another question might be, how can we support you as an organisation to help her, and others like her, when we leave?
C & D, visitors from Scotland, June 30th 2014
 
Many thanks for your very kind email. As you may have gathered from the website, yours is a fairly common situation! So far as I know, it is possible to take cats out of the country using the pet passport scheme. It is certainly routine with dogs. I am not familiar with the procedures for cats, but they must be similar to those for dogs. I think you have left it a bit late to do the necessary inoculations for taking her back with you, but I will ask at the vet's tomorrow morning, as I am going there with some of my dogs for their annual vaccinations. If it is not too late, the other thing would be to check with your airline whether you can take a small cat in the cabin, or if she would have to be put in the hold. On most airlines, pets which can fit into a small carrier can go in the cabin, which is of course less traumatic for the animal than putting it into the hold. If it is too late to arrange the transport to Scotland, you should be consoled by the fact that during the summer most of the stray cats are given food by kind tourists and locals or from the restaurants. Cats are generally good survivors, and it is of course important for us to accept that everyone has his/her own destiny. We do what we can to make their lives better and longer, but we can't hope to create an animal utopia in this imperfect world. 
It is kind of you to offer to support our charity, and the details for making donations to our bank account are given on the home page under the heading 'How you can help'. As individuals we help as many animals as we can, and we are working on the animal shelter project, which involves a huge amount of planning and eventually money. Tomorrow we are going to look at potential sites for the shelter, which is key to putting the project forward for funding from international organizations.
If you would like to send me a mobile number, I can text you once I have been to the vet's tomorrow.
Eco Hvar June 30th 2014

From the Vet: Cats over 3 months old have to be micro-chipped and inoculated against rabies, and they can travel a month later. Younger cats do not have to be micro-chipped, just inoculated.

It was therefore too late for C & D to prepare the cat for travel, and anyway as it turned out, their airline would not carry pets of any kind in the hold or in the cabin.

There are lots of helpful tips for travelling with cats on the internet, including 'How to travel with a cat', and 'Cat travel: flying with cats'. 

Related items

You are here: Home forum items Stray cat in Hvar Town

Eco Environment News feeds

  • Thousands of protesters occupied bridges across the Thames over extinction crisis in huge act of peaceful civil disobedience

    Eighty-five people have been arrested as thousands of demonstrators occupied five bridges in central London to voice their concern over the looming climate crisis.

    Protesters, including families and pensioners, began massing on five of London’s main bridges from 10am on Saturday. An hour later, all the crossings had been blocked in one of the biggest acts of peaceful civil disobedience in the UK in decades. Some people locked themselves together, while others linked arms and sang songs.

    Continue reading...

  • Scientists in Brazil find first evidence of plastic pollution in Amazon basin freshwater fish

    Scientists have found the first evidence of plastic contamination in freshwater fish in the Amazon, highlighting the extent to which bags, bottles and other waste dumped in rivers is affecting the world’s wildlife.

    Tests on the stomach contents of fish in Brazil’s Xingu River, one of the major tributaries of the Amazon, revealed plastic particles in more than 80% of the species examined, including the omnivorous parrot pacu, herbivorous redhook silver dollar, and meat-eating red-bellied piranha.

    Continue reading...

  • Cuadrilla won’t say if it has halted Preston New Road exploration, at cost of £94,000 a day

    The shale gas firm Cuadrilla has refused to confirm whether it has halted fracking after triggering a series of minor earthquakes near Blackpool, raising questions over the operation’s future prospects.

    Dozens of small tremors have been registered near the company’s Preston New Road site, after it started pumping high volumes of water undergroundin October to explore for gas.

    Continue reading...

  • Starlings over Rome and the ‘smiling angel’ of the Yangtze are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world

    Continue reading...

  • Huge expansion of agri-food industry is harming environment, say investigators

    Green energy subsidies are fuelling the rise of poultry mega-farms across Northern Ireland, with owners accused of contaminating sensitive habitats with emissions from chicken faeces.

    An alliance of agri-food companies enlisted the support of Northern Ireland politicians to unlock an estimated £800m in subsidies for contractors. This has paved the way for industry expansion at the expense of the environment, according to an investigation by the not-for-profit journalism group SourceMaterial.

    Continue reading...

  • In the last 30 years, gulls have come among us as never before. But is their moment coming to an end as we tackle our waste problem?

    When was the last day you didn’t see a gull? Throughout Britain we ordinarily cross paths with these birds more often than with any other wild creature. They are hard to avoid. In the last 30 years – the lifespan of a large gull – they have come among us as never before. Though still popularly regarded as seagulls, many have moved inland, far from the seaside or saltwater. They have adapted to life in many places we have made, and they have thrived.

    Cities and their hinterlands where we jettison our rubbish now sustain far more gulls than the birds’ former more traditional marine habitats. Indeed, in a paradox that might define the Anthropocene era, surviving coastal birds are now regarded as threatened with local extinction, while the same gull species in urban areas are so prevalent they are thought of as pests.

    Continue reading...

  • Ranking of countries’ goals shows even EU on course for more than double safe level of warming

    China, Russia and Canada’s current climate policies would drive the world above a catastrophic 5C of warming by the end of the century, according to a study that ranks the climate goals of different countries.

    The US and Australia are only slightly behind with both pushing the global temperature rise dangerously over 4C above pre-industrial levels says the paper, while even the EU, which is usually seen as a climate leader, is on course to more than double the 1.5C that scientists say is a moderately safe level of heating.

    Continue reading...

  • ‘The two things I love most are novels and birds, and they’re both in trouble,’ says The Corrections author, one of the world’s most famous birdwatchers

    Birdwatching was once an activity that elicited a sense of mild shame in Jonathan Franzen. The author stalked New York parks with binoculars in hand, rather than on a strap, carefully hiding from view the word “birds” on his field guide. Debonair friends in London recoiled in horror when told of his pastime. Franzen was furtive, almost embarrassed. Now, he is one of the most famous birdwatchers in the world.

    “I totally let my freak flag fly now,” Franzen says as he scans for birds at a community garden near his home in Santa Cruz, California. His phone has an app that deciphers bird sounds. He travels the world to see recondite species. He has written about birds in essays, op-eds and novels.

    “I was so socially unsuccessful in my youth and such a pariah in junior high that I really didn’t want to look like a dork,” says Franzen, the 59-year-old author whose best known works include The Corrections and Freedom. “I got over that. The success started to make me think: ‘Hey, it’s not me who’s got the problem.’”

    Continue reading...

  • Undersea forests, bleached and killed by rising ocean temperature, might disappear in a few decades, experts warn

    Children born today may be the last generation to see coral reefs in all their glory, according to a marine biologist who is coordinating efforts to monitor the decline of the world’s most colourful ecosystem.

    Global heating and ocean acidification have already severely bleached 16 to 33% of all warm-water reefs, but the remainder are vulnerable to even a fraction of a degree more warming, said David Obura, chair of the Coral Specialist Group in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

    Continue reading...

  • In the latest from our series on biodiversity, the Blue Hill chef says we’ve got sustainable agriculture wrong. It’s not a question of sacrifice, but deliciousness

    “How does it taste?” says Dan Barber, regarding me expectantly in the garden of Blue Hill at Stone Barns, his restaurant in the Hudson Valley just north of New York. I am gnawing the crust of a large piece of bread that has been grown from Barber Wheat, a hybrid seed developed by Barber and his partners to be nutrient dense, high in yield and – a radical thought in seed breeding, apparently – full of flavour. (Whereas clapped out old seeds might yield 30 bushels an acre, Barber Wheat will stretch to 95). The bread is simultaneously light, and dense, and intricate in flavour in such a way that I can’t think of a single word to do it justice. Barber, who at 49 has the manic energy of someone for whom no plate of food will ever live up to the ideal in his head, looks at me gloomily. “That’s the whole problem with food writing,” he says.

    There are bigger problems in the food world. With the possible exception of “financial regulation”, there can be few more deadly phrases to the casual reader than “sustainable agriculture”, a heavy-weather issue most of us recognise as increasingly important but nonetheless killingly dull. This is where Barber, who set up his restaurant in 2004, is hugely persuasive, a charismatic leader who, if you talk to him for an hour while walking around the kitchen and bucolic surroundings of Stone Barns, will have you genuinely excited about crop rotation, and soil conditions, and the fact that the food industry is a dying behemoth reliant on low-yield, agronomically risky seeds that produce ever more tasteless and nutrition-less food.

    Continue reading...

Eco Health News feeds

Eco Nature News feeds