Ministry of Tourism Covid-19 Relief Measures

Published in Notices

Due to the effects of the Covid-19 virus, the Ministry of Tourism has announced financial relief measures for those engaged in the tourist industry.

The full text of the Ministry of Tourism Relief Measures is available on the Ministry website, but in Croatian only, although part of the website is translated i

nto English. The information will certainly be of use to the many English-speakers renting out accommodation on Hvar and in Croatia generally. 

Tourist fee payment relief

Private renters will not have to pay the tourist fee lump sum (paušal); payment of any outstanding flexible part of the 2019 concession fee is cancelled, and payment for 2020 deferred; the relevant changes in the laws (NN 36/2020) can be seen on the following link (in Croatian): https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/full/2020_03_36_764.html

People offering tourist rentals in private accommodation and on family farms are excused half of the annual tourist fee for 2020 which would normally be due for the main bed and parking spot in a camp and holiday camp, or according to the capacity of 'Robinson' accommodation run in accordance with the special regulations governing tourist rental activities. Furthermore, tourist fee in 2020 for camp beds ('pomoćni kreveti') will not be charged.

These measures only apply to people offering accommodation in private properties and on privately owned farmland.

The aim is to soften the financial impact of the economic burden created by the Coronavirus epidemic. Because the tourist fee is administered per bed, rather than per night's stay, it is clearly unfair and untenable in the current situation.

The responsible authorities for these measures are the Ministry of Tourism and the Croatian Tourist Board. Information about the measures will be available through the eVisitor internet system. Further information can be obtained if needed from the Ministry of Tourism by email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Payment of any outstanding amount due for the 2019 concession fee in respect of the use of tourist land in camps is waived, and the payment due for 2020 is deferred. The applicable law (NN 31/2020) can be seen (in Croatian) on the link: https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/full/2020_03_31_674.html

In view of the exceptional situation caused by the Coronavirus, outstanding payments due for the 2019 concession fees for camps will be charged at 1 kn, and not at the standard rate, and payments due for the fixed concession fee for 2020 will be delayed from August 31st to November 30th 2020. The measure applies to commercial agencies offering tourist services on the basis of seeking concessions for camps on communal land in the Republic of Croatia according to the law (NN 92/10). Details of the charges will be made available by the Ministry of Tourism, and further information, if needed, can be obtained by email from the Ministry: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The same measures apply to those holding concessions on land owned by local authorities, and the applicable law (NN 41/2020) can be read (in Croatian) on the following link: https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2020_04_41_853.html.

The Croatian Law on Providing Tourist Services (NN 42/2020 -887) has been amended and can be read (in Croatian) on the following link: https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2020_04_42_887.html. The changes include the following:

- in order to prevent the operation of unregistered rental accommodation, internet sites must quote the tax identity number (OIB) of any advertiser offering tourist services in the Republic of Croatia;

- during this exceptional situation, tourist agencies will be allowed to employ people without the normal required certificates in order to keep operating, so that knowledge of foreign languages or Croatian do not have to be demonstrated, nor is it necessary for such employees to have a minimum of one year's experience in the tourist industry. These employees can remain in employment for a maximum of six months after the end of the special measures.

- contracts for package tours which were booked to take place after March 1st but cancelled are to be varied as following: the traveller has the right to cancel the package tour 180 days after the end of the exceptional situation caused by Coronavirus, and the tour operator must issue a voucher or moratorium on the cancellation of the contract for the same period; if the client decides on a refund, the tour operator must return the amount paid within 14 days after the period of 180 days following the end of the exceptional situation has elapsed.

- people providing tour guide services will no longer be entered into the Central register. This aims to allow more people to earn money from tourist services, such as students, pensioners or the unemployed.

The Law on Providing Accommodation Services has also been amended (NN 42/2020-888), and can be found (in Croatian) on the following link: https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2020_04_42_888.html
The changes are as follows:

- temporary permits for rental premises will be extended to the end of 2021. This applies to properties which have not yet been legalized although the application for legalization was submitted at the right time.

- the Minister is empowered to vary the conditions regarding the requirements for people in the hospitality and rental businesses.

- the deadline for re-categorizing hotels and camps is extended. Applications will start from 1 year after the end of the Covid-19 special measures situation, instead of after 4 years from the original permit.

- hotel and camp operators who have been granted a temporary operations permit for the type of operation, but not yet for the category of the premises, are granted an extension of one year following the end of the Covid-19 special measures in the Republic of Croatia.

- for renters whose categorization permits were issued before September 1st 2007, and for those who wish to retain their existing level of category (star rating), applications for new documents must be made before the following deadlines:
8.4.2022 – for permits issued before 31.12.2000.
8.4.2023 – for permits issued between 1.1.2001 and 31.12.2004.
8.4.2024 – for permits issued after 31.12.2004.

The Law Governing Tourist Boards and the Promotion of Croatian Tourism has been amended to alleviate financial constraints caused by the Covid-19 epidemic. You can read the amendments (NN 42/2020-885) on the following link (in Croatian): https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2020_04_42_885.html

The Law on the Tourist Fee has been amended, (NN 42/2020-886) and can be read (in Croatian) on the following link: https://narodne-novine.nn.hr/clanci/sluzbeni/2020_04_42_886. The amendments are as follows:

- during the Covid-19 special situation, the Croatian Government is empowered to vary the system for determining the level of the tourist fee and the deadlines for its payment.

- the Croatian Government is also empowered to repurpose resources from the Fund for Insufficiently Developed Inland Areas and the Fund for Associated Tourist Boards.

- while the special conditions caused by the Covid-19 epidemic last, inspectors will not issue fines or penalty notices, or institute legal action in the case of contraventions.

If you need further information, contact the Ministry of Tourism by email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

May 2020

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