Birdwatch, January 2019

A slow start to the birdwatching year in Dol, following on from the disappointing numbers at the end of 2018.

Black-necked Grebe – Stari Grad – 13.01.19 Black-necked Grebe – Stari Grad – 13.01.19 Photo: Steve Jones

Well another year of recording sightings begins. The number of species seen it is pretty much the same as the previous three years. Some of the species differ but primarily most are as expected. I keep expecting to see more, perhaps not species wise but more of the individual birds. Some Winter thrushes I have seen here in the past don’t appear to have come, birds such as Redwing, Fieldfare and Mistle Thrush. I thought I may have glimpsed Fieldfare and Woodcock on a couple of occasions but I don’t list anything down unless I am 100% sure.

I am still very disappointed with the numbers feeding on my feeders at the house. I am pretty well seeing just Chaffinch. Last year it was predominantly Great Tit and Blue tit and they were clearing my feeders in 48 hours, this Winter it is about three weeks before the food goes. The “fat balls” are barely touched, I did see a Robin feeding on them once.

I was very pleased to see the return of the Black-necked Grebe, I saw it at about the same time as last year and just on the one occasion. However this year I did manage to get a picture. It is a shame it is the Winter as rather a pretty bird in Summer plumage.

Another bird down at Stari Grad although not seen so often this Winter and also appearing for me rather late in January is the Kingfisher.

Kingfisher, Stari Grad (photographed in 2018). Photo Steve Jones

I am down at the airfield and the pond most days at different times but nothing seems to make too much difference timing wise. Generally I would say the numbers are a lot less this winter. There are several flocks of Chaffinch and one or two very small flocks of Goldfinch but I am not seeing them every day. Similarly there have been up to 40 Hooded Crows on the airfield but you see them for two consecutive days and then nothing.

Hooded Crows on the airfield. Photo: Steve Jones

I am frequently seeing one and sometimes two Grey Heron at the pond but they fly off the moment they hear my car.

Great Tit feeding, Dol, pictured in 2018. Photo: Steve Jones

I am away throughout February, so if any reader would like to send in reports of their sightings, especially with pictures, it would be good. – we should certainly be seeing the first of the Summer arrivals, perhaps the odd Swallow.

You can write to my email address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

JANUARY 2019 LISTING

© Steve Jones 2019.

For more of Steve's nature pictures, see his personal pages: Bird Pictures on Hvar 2017Bird Pictures and Sightings on Hvar 2018, and Butterflies of Hvar

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