For the Common Good

For the Common Good

Dogs: how to help when needed

Published in For the Common Good

Lots of dogs have a tough time on Hvar and in other parts of Croatia. Helping dogs in need can be tricky. These are basic guidelines to help show you what can and can't be done.

Poisoning Paradise - A Wake-Up Call

Published in For the Common Good

Croatia's unsustainable insect suppression programme​: TIME IS RUNNING OUT!

CATS: HOW TO HELP WHEN NEEDED

Published in For the Common Good

If you want to help cats in need on Hvar, here's how!

Scrumping on Hvar? We advise against it.

Published in For the Common Good

As July progresses, the grapes ripen on the vines, ready to reach their full luscious ripeness later on in August. However, foraging is not recommended.     

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Eco Environment News feeds

  • How the trappings of fame are causing problems for the placid mammal that has become a star of internet memes and Instagram

    Nobody seems to know quite how the sloth became the rock star of the animal kingdom. From high in the Latin American rainforest, the absurd mammal is the focus of a frenzied obsession that shows no sign of abating. Sloths are on bank notes, adverts, T-shirts, internet memes and Instagram fan pages.

    “People are obsessed,” says Costa Rica’s president, Carlos Alvarado Quesada, when asked why people have fallen in love with the creature. “The sloth is quite a unique animal. It’s also very related to the forest. I believe it’s the elegance of the movement.”

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  • Researchers have found the rock has a self-sealing mechanism that keeps fluids locked away

    We need to find somewhere safe to dispose of high-level nuclear waste; a place where we can be confident it will be isolated and contained for hundreds of thousands of years. And if we want to keep a lid on global warming then we may well need to find a similar place to store carbon dioxide too. But where?

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  • Remembering Wildlife, the groundbreaking charity picture book series, has announced the 10 winners of its photography competition to appear in its forthcoming book, Remembering Cheetahs, which will help to protect the world’s most endangered big cat. There are only around 7,100 cheetahs left in the wild. The book will be published on Monday 12 October and the winning images will be printed alongside stunning images donated by many of the world’s leading wildlife photographers

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  • The powerful forces behind the death of the Honduran indigenous leader are still targeting human rights defenders and environmental campaigners like her


    • Join a conversation with the author on Tuesday 9 June:Nina Lakhani joins Guardian US international editor Martin Hodgson to discuss the story behind Cáceres’s murder. Live on the Guardian at 1pm EST/10am PST/5pm BST. Email [email protected] to sign up and get a reminder

    Fifty-one months ago today, Berta Cáceres was gunned down by hired assassins at her home in western Honduras.

    Cáceres was an indigenous leader, a political radical and a grassroots human rights defender who dedicated her life to resisting the patriarchal neoliberal world order and fighting for environmental justice. She was smart, kind, provocative and a rare leader who could listen, negotiate and bring people together. She was killed less than a year after winning the prestigious Goldman environmental prize for leading a campaign to stop construction of an internationally funded hydroelectric dam on a river considered sacred by the indigenous Lenca people.

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  • Record-breaking rainfall has devastated communities – and with thousands displaced and more rain predicted the picture is bleak

    Using a short piece of nylon line with a hook at one end and a long thin stick on the other, a mechanic and a nightclub doorman have only caught one small fish all day.

    “I’ve never been a fisherman before,” says Erick Ochieng on the edge of a flooded creek in the port city of Kisumu on the banks of Lake Victoria. “I used to work as a bouncer but nightclubs have closed. Sometimes my family sleeps without eating.”

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  • Report also warns Australia will experience more extreme fire seasons due to climate crisis

    The amount of pristine tropical rainforest lost across the globe increased last year, as the equivalent of a football pitch disappeared every six seconds, a satellite-based analysis has found.

    Nearly 12m hectares of tree cover was lost across the tropics, including nearly 4m hectares of dense, old rainforest that held significant stores of carbon and had been home to a vast array of wildlife, according to data from the University of Maryland.

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  • Analysis shows 500 species on brink of extinction – as many as were lost over previous century

    The sixth mass extinction of wildlife on Earth is accelerating, according to an analysis by scientists who warn it may be a tipping point for the collapse of civilisation.

    More than 500 species of land animals were found to be on the brink of extinction and likely to be lost within 20 years. In comparison, the same number were lost over the whole of the last century. Without the human destruction of nature, even this rate of loss would have taken thousands of years, the scientists said.

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  • Europe is going coal-free, but a vast lignite mine is expanding in eastern Germany and coronavirus has delayed new climate laws

    The landscape makes you think of the surface of the moon. As far as the eye can see, deep gashes scar the earth. At the spot where the giant machines stand, ancient layers of bared coal are visible all the way to the base of the pit.

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  • Many black nature-lovers have to employ defense mechanisms – lest a situation turn sticky and they have to answer questions from a suspecting police officer

    It was 2011 when Rue Mapp was followed by a white woman in an Oakland, California, park, while out on a national campaign to get local families connected with nature.

    The woman had spotted the group en route to the park and decided to follow them. When they got off the bus, she followed them all the way through the park, and when they began to play in the dirt, she started to harass them. She claimed they were bringing “invasive species” into the park.

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  • The flowering bedstraw was thought to have died out on the sub-Antarctic island in the 1980s

    A critically-endangered herb once thought extinct on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island has been found growing at a new location as the world-heritage site continues its rabbit-free recovery. 

    The remote island was declared free of pests in 2014, following a seven-year feral animal eradication project.

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