Insects Wanted!

Insects Wanted!

Insects Wanted!

Published in Insects Wanted!
Poisons, definitely not! Eco Hvar's campaign against the indiscriminate use of chemical pesticides to kill off unwanted insects and other 'pests' began many years ago. In Croatia, by law, unwanted pests which are potentially health-harming have to be limited or preferably eliminated. However, current practices, both by public authorities and individuals are causing a mass extermination of insects and interdependent wildlife, which is nothing short of catastrophic. And, by law, this should not be happening.

Scrumping on Hvar? We advise against it.

Published in Insects Wanted!
As July progresses, the grapes ripen on the vines, ready to reach their full luscious ripeness later on in August. Hvar's fields offer plenty of edible plants for our health and delight throughout the year. However, foraging is not recommended.     
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  • Why people should be worried about the blazes and increased deforestation in Brazil

    Thousands of fires are burning in Brazil, many of them in the world’s biggest rainforest, which is sending clouds of smoke across the region and pumping alarming quantities of carbon into the world’s atmosphere.

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  • Only 230 of the sub-species remain in the wild, a population that will become unsustainable without interbreeding

    • The Guardian Australia/Birdlife Australia bird of the year poll will return in October

    Researchers have introduced three dozen hybrid helmeted honeyeaters into the wild in an attempt to prevent the critically endangered bird from dying out because of inbreeding.

    On Friday, the juvenile birds were released into the Yellingbo Nature Conservation Reserve, which holds the only wild population of critically endangered helmeted honeyeaters, in an unusual attempt at genetic species rescue.

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  • The blaze in the Amazon shows the need for a green Marshall plan to allow poorer parts of the world to benefit from low-carbon tech

    Judging by the latest opinion polls, the public is ripe for some green austerity. Ipsos Mori says that 85% of Britons are concerned about climate change, with 52% admitting they are very concerned. These are the highest figures since the pollster started tracking opinion in 2005. Given the spate of extreme weather-related events, and the pictures of the torching of the Amazon rainforest, such concern is both logical and predictable. In this country, the climate deniers have been put to flight.

    What the polls don’t show is whether the public is willing to translate this concern into action; whether similar levels of concern are present in less prosperous parts of the world; and whether it is possible to translate individual concerns into collective political action. Here, the message is a lot more mixed. The furore over the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s private jets are a case in point. People don’t like being lectured to, particularly when those doing the lecturing fail to live by their own ethical code.

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  • Officer captured on undercover film advising farmers during badger cull briefing

    Devon and Cornwall police have apologised after an officer appeared to refer to animal rights activists as “idiots” at a badger cull briefing.

    Undercover filming obtained by campaign group Stop the Cull reveals a police liaison officer advising farmers and marksmen involved in executing the policy on how to deal with activists and saying he would confiscate cameras set up to monitor badger traps.

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  • Endangered white rhinos, breeding cycads and fires in the Amazon rainforest

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  • Some African nations at Cites conference argue sales would provide much-needed income

    An audacious attempt to allow a huge sale of stockpiled elephant ivory has been defeated at an international wildlife conference. The rancorous debate exposed deep divisions between African nations with opposing views on elephant conservation.

    About 50 elephants are still being poached every day to supply ivory traffickers and all countries agree the world’s largest land animal needs greater protection. But southern African nations, which have some of the largest elephant populations, want to allow more legal sales of ivory to fund conservation and community development. But 32 other African nations argue all trade in elephants must end, including the trophy hunting legal in some states.

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  • Pilot scheme on Network Rail’s Wessex route could pave way for direct powering of trains

    The world’s first solar farm to power a railway line directly is due to plug into the track near Aldershot, paving the way for solar-powered trains.

    From Friday, about 100 solar panels at the trackside site will supply renewable electricity to power the signalling and lights on Network Rail’s Wessex route.

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  • Three protesters found guilty despite intervention of shadow chancellor in their support

    Three Extinction Rebellion activists involved in protests in central London in April have been convicted of public order offences at a trial which heard a message of support for them from the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell.

    The men were among more than 1,000 people arrested during the environmental group’s demonstrations – which caused large-scale disruption in what organisers described as the biggest act of civil disobedience in recent British history – but are the first to have gone on trial with legal representation.

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  • Conservationists hope release of six eaglets on Isle of Wight will mirror Scotland success

    White-tailed eagles are gracing the skies of southern Britain for the first time in 240 years after six eaglets were released on the Isle of Wight.

    The huge birds, which are fitted with satellite tags, are expected to disperse along the south coast of England in a scheme backed by the environment secretary, Theresa Villiers, who welcomed the return of the “majestic” species.

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  • Restoration project uses seed-rich hay taken from roadside verges to regrow lost meadows

    There is something back to front about the idyllic scene on a meadow south of Norwich. Hay is normally gathered in, but this freshly cut, sweet-smelling grass is being carefully forked across a field.

    The hay, harvested from nearby roadside verges, is spread to scatter the seeds contained within it, part of an innovative scheme to restore natural flower-rich meadows and reverse losses. More than 97% of Britain’s wildflower meadows have vanished since the 1930s.

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