Heartfelt plea

Published in About Animals

A visitor from Slovenia helped cats in Pokrivenik through her holiday. Now they need help! Everyone is doing what they can.

"I turn to you with a large request...

This year we were on holiday in Hvar, the bay Pokrivenik. This is somewhere half an hour from Jelsa towards Sućuraj.

We were there In September in a small family hotel called Timun.There is only this hotel, a few apartments and no inhabitants.

The sad story is that there are also abandoned cats seeking for food. Even more sad is that the season is over, the hotel is closed and all the workers left.
By May next year, there is no one there.This means that cats can not find food, because there is not any. There are five cats, female, male and three kittens, about six months old.
All ten days of my vacation, I fed them. Waitress at the hotel told me, that every day they fed the cats, but that of course was not true.
Here and there was someone who throw them something under the table. Because then was very hot, they came only in the evening, after dark.

These cats someone left and I do not know what will happen to them. A few kilometers away is another bay Zaraće, which otherwise has a few inhabitants.
Even there I saw some cats, but I think it's a little too far, that these cats know how to get there. I please you from my heart, if you could go and see what is happening with the cats or can you do anything for them. So far there are only five and it would be really sad that they die of hunger.

I am willing to donate some money. Please, if you could inform me."

IŠ By e-mail, October 3rd 2015, full name supplied

REPLY, Eco Hvar October 8th 2015

I am extremely sorry to hear about the cats in Pokrivenik, and equally sorry that you are so worried about them.

I have put out a call for help through Facebook and personally around friends and acquaintances who love animals.

Sadly, the prospect of anyone being able to help the cats is slight. Most of us are at maximum capacity, and bringing any more into our neighbourhoods only invites the people who hate animals to poison them.

On the brighter side, it sometimes happens that people like yourself find such cats and are able to give them a home; and that the cats themselves manage to find shelter and a welcome. Nothing is impossible.

IŠ E-mail October 20th 2015

I thank you for your answer and that you took your time. I apologize to bother you again, but I have another question.

I am a volunteer in our city and also care for abandoned cats. That includes feeding and of course, first of all, to spay them.

Most of them are feral and they are happy to live outdoors. Some of them never find a warm home, some does.

Neutering these cats are free of charge in our animal shelter. I know that is a totally different situation in Hvar.

I wonder if you have someone who would be willing to take these cats to sterilization, it means only female cats (mother and I think one of kittens is female) and then return them back?  As I said, I would donate money and I also send you some food. I know that there are many cats everywhere and they will survive without human help. 

In order to prevent further suffering and struggle for survival, it is necessary to reduce the population.

Please let me know if that would be possible.

Thank you for your kindness and your time!

EH REPLY November 9th 2015

Many thanks for your further letter with your offer to help the Hvar stray cats. I apologise for the delay in replying.

Sadly, I cannot see that your offer is practical. Here, the vet charges about 500 kunas for cat sterilizations, and they have no facilities for caring for the cats immediately after the operation. This means that someone would have to go to find the cats, identify the females, bring them back to Stari Grad, find them a safe place to recover from the operation (I usually keep mine secure until the day after, if all goes well) and then return them to their territory.

Firstly, I think to be fair to the cats, someone would need to make friends with them and gain their trust first. Secondly, I don't know anyone who would have the time to spare to carry this out. It would be different if they were in Jelsa or somewhere where conditions could be created so that the sterilizations could take place with minimum trauma to the cats. But the current situation is not like that.

I am sorry to reply in the negative. It is very hard for animal lovers to look after all the needy animals on Hvar. I have just finished a piece about some of my cats, which you might enjoy: http://www.eco-hvar.com/en/about-animals/131-cats-music-fun

Keep up the good work! It is a blessing to know that people like you are active in caring for our four-legged friends-

EH Further news November 15th 2015

A man who has olives near Pokrivenik tells me that cats thrive there, even after the summer season. A lady in the next bay, Zaraće, feeds a multitude of cats! Unfortunately she doesn't sterilize them. But they do have sustenance. I hear that some of the cats are enormous! and also great hunters, so generally they don't have a problem surviving.

So, don't worry, the cats are all in with a chance.

IŠ Email November 15th 2015

you don't know how happy I am to hear this. I was really worried about them.

Too bad that this lady can not sterilize them. Thank you for letting me know.

 I hope next year I will come to Hvar again.

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